This is exciting

But dreadfully painful.

I just found out that the computer I'm currently running is new enough to have come with OS X 10.4, but when we first got it, we had cloned it using my older iMac, so I can start up in OS 9 if I want to. Which means, theoretically, I could download and play the original EV with no problems. But I feel unable to give up my beloved Kestrel and everything on it.

Is it possible to convert a pilot file from EV Nova to EV Classic in this situation, or am I gonna have to start all over if I decide to go OS 9?

Pilot files are a bit of a closed book compared to the plug-in format. There have been a few utilities that can work with them (I think there was even one which could convert to Nova ) but they're far between, and your situation isn't the usual one.

In any case, I wouldn't suggest switching to the original engine. Unlike EV Nova , the first two games don't automatically scale their speed to fit your processor. This means that if you play on a computer substantially newer than what was current in 1996, everything will go far too fast. Theoretically you can fix this by adjusting the speed slider, but reducing speed doesn't always work right (presumably it didn't get tested much since no one needed it in 1996).

Plus, only the Nova Engine lets you see a mini map when selecting a hyperspace destination during flight. If you ask me, the ports of EVC and EVO are a lot more fun than the originals.

True, I guess the only things that were actually better in the original version were the Flares and the Tractor Beam.

Well, that's the end of that problem. 🙂

It does not play too fast... at least not on any Mac I've used it on. And because it's EV it has many nice quirks that Nova doesn't. Such as the ability to abort no missions and have all the missions on the planet reset without having to leave.

QUOTE (EVWeb @ Mar 7 2010, 11:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It does not play too fast... at least not on any Mac I've used it on.

Have you ever played it on a 1996 computer so that you have something to compare it with?

QUOTE

and have all the missions on the planet reset without having to leave.

Holy crap, no way! That'd be an amazing thing to have in Nova.

QUOTE (David Arthur @ Mar 10 2010, 03:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Have you ever played it on a 1996 computer so that you have something to compare it with?

I originally played on a 1993/4 LCIII but I can't quite remember the difference in speed - the main difference I do remember is the 2 minute loading time, 5+ minutes for EVO. Worth it of course, but causing me to forget other things of interest :).

Edit: woot 800th post.

This post has been edited by MartiNZ : 09 March 2010 - 02:39 PM

QUOTE (David Arthur @ Mar 9 2010, 06:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Have you ever played it on a 1996 computer so that you have something to compare it with?

Yup, until last year I did.

QUOTE (MartiNZ @ Mar 9 2010, 02:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

. . . the main difference I do remember is the 2 minute loading time, 5+ minutes for EVO. Worth it of course, but causing me to forget other things of interest :).

Yes, I remember starting it on my 660av, and then going away to do something else while it loaded. Later on, everyone was impressed by my 7200's ability to finish loading it before the music even ended.

Those were the days! The LCIII also gave EVO some other fun quirks. The larger sprite ships - Freighters, UE Cruisers, Voinian Cruisers and Dreadnoughts - had their images corrupt when facing between 9 and 12 o'clock. Recalling fighters and giving commands to escorts would lock up the game completely. And none of that happened in EVC on the older machines :).

You know you're dedicated to a game when you fondly remember even the bad times with it.

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